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FAQs

Our Firm has the special combination of experience and empathy in the delivery of legal services. We understand that your family’s future is at stake. We use our knowledge of immigration law along with our ability to connect with clients to place you on the best path towards a case victory. Even in situations where a victory is limited by law, we empower you with information to feel in control about your future. We believe all immigrants deserve to receive legal services in a language they understand and are proud to offer that to our Spanish speaking community. Finally, we believe our clients should be treated with dignity and operate our Firm with the highest integrity.

Only an attorney can provide legal advice. Many people believe that immigration law only entails filling out forms, but picking the wrong forms to complete, providing incorrect information, or applying for relief that one is not eligible for can expose individuals to unnecessary problems, including case delays or threats of deportation.

We request that each interested client complete our Client Screening Form so that we can gather details to better understand your needs.

Due to the focus of our work, we are unable to accept all cases. However, we encourage you to contact us to see if we can help.

If you entered the United States with a visa or any other legal way, you may be eligible to apply for your green card through your U.S. citizen son or daughter who is over 21 years old. If you entered the United States without permission, you maybe be able to apply for a green card through your U.S. citizen son or daughter who is over 21 if you can obtain a waiver.

If you were deported along the border, your punishment may not be over if you entered the United States shortly after without permission. If you’ve been deported, immigration law requires a waiver before you can obtain a green card or re-enter the United States, so if you entered the country without requesting a waiver, then it’s likely your punishment period hasn’t even started.

There is no law that allows you to get a green card simply because you’ve lived in the country for 10 years.

Not necessarily. The attorney makes strong arguments against ineligibility due to criminal history.

You need to have a pending application for a green card with an immigration agency. You can also get a work permit and a social security number after other types of applications are approved, such as for a U visa for victims of crimes and Parole in Place for family of military members and veterans, and if your asylum application has been pending for a certain period of time.

If you entered the country with a visa or with permission, or if your family member filed a petition for you, your spouse or your parent prior to April 30, 2001, you may not need to leave the country to apply for a green card. There are also other categories of green card applicants who don’t need to leave the country, such as U visa, VAWA, and asylum holders. If you entered the country without permission, it is likely that you will have to leave the country to finalize your application to obtain a green card.

It depends. Immigration law creates categories of people who need waivers before their green card application can be approved. The most common reasons for waivers are certain criminal convictions, lying to immigration authorities, living in the United States without permission, and helping someone enter the United States illegally. Generally, waivers require that you show your U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident spouse or parent will suffer extreme hardship if your waiver isn’t approved.

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Your immigration advocate.

Our Firm will contact you after you complete the Case Assessment to discuss how we can help you.

Copyright © 2021 | Law Office of Irma Pérez P.C.

The information on this website is for general information purposes only and is not intended to create an attorney-client relationship. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation.